Le Salon

For Tea Reservations:
Call 504.596.4773 or Book online now

Easter Tea

Gather with friends and family to celebrate Easter with a delightful spring tea service in Le Salon.  Savor a bountiful array of your favorite gourmet tea sandwiches, seasonal scones with clotted cream, and themed desserts. 

Saturday, April 19 at 11:00 a.m. & 2:00 p.m.

Sunday, April 20 at 11:00 a.m. & 2:00 p.m.


Mother's Day Tea

Honor the women in your life with New Orleans’ favorite Mother’s Day tradition: afternoon tea at Le Salon. Generations of mothers, grandmothers, daughters, and granddaughters can gather to celebrate with our special Mother’s Day menu, and every mom will leave with a special parting gift.

Saturday, May 10 at 11:00 a.m. & 2:00 p.m.

Sunday, May 11 at 11:00 a.m., 2:00 p.m. & 4:30 p.m.


An Afternoon Affair

Le Salon, in Windsor Court’s lobby, serves an afternoon tea that is as elegant and gracious as its setting. It’s a New Orleans tradition of a distinctly New Orleans kind. Perfect, and perfectly unpretentious.

Enjoy any of 26 fine loose-leaf teas, expertly brewed to the fullness of flavor. Sample delectable tea sandwiches. A harpist or trio lends a subtle, tasteful accompaniment to your thoughts or conversation.

This afternoon is yours.

Thursday & Friday at 2:00 pm
Saturday & Sunday at 11:00 am & 2:00 pm

View a Full Description of Le Salon’s Tea Service

Download the 2014 Themed Tea Calendar


 

History of Afternoon Tea

This is the service that comes to mind when people think of English tea ceremonies. The tradition was originated in the mid 1800s, when the Duchess of Bedford began ordering a tray of tea with bread and butter in the mid-afternoon to combat fainting spells. In those days, lunch was served at noon, but dinner was not served until 8 or even 9 o'clock at night. The Duchess found herself hungry during those long afternoon hours. Tea service became a regular occurrence and as she began to invite other high-society ladies to join her, it became quite the fashionable afternoon pastime. Along with tea, the ladies would enjoy delicate tea sandwiches, scones with clotted cream and preserves and petit fours.

 

High Tea vs. Afternoon Tea Many people use the term "High Tea" to describe the event mentioned above. But High Tea is a much different thing. It was served later (around six in the evening) and consisted of a full, dinner meal for the common people. Tea was still served, but there would also be meats, fish or eggs, cheese, bread and butter, and cake. It was more of a man's meal, than a ladies social diversion.